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PBS STUDY: Heavy Marijuana Use Leads To Poor Memory, ADHD

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Daily use of marijuana destroys the brain, new study proves.

New studies reveal that marijuana is more dangerous than previously known.  Scientific analysis from PBS reveals that heavy marijuana use not only causes poor memory, it also destroys the brain and causes abnormal structure.

Marijuana’s effect on the brain eventually leads to cognitive disorders such as dementia and ADHD.  We have seen an increase in these disorders because states like Colorado, Washington and California are allowing people to openly smoke marijuana.  It is putting the rest of the public at risk for second-hand marijuana smoke exposure and thus we are seeing little kids hardly able to sit still, and our golden-aged citizens not able to think clearly.

Teenagers who smoke marijuana have lower ACT and SAT scores, scientists proved.  The abnormal changes in brain structure, as found by researchers at America’s top medical school Northwestern, disable a teenager’s ability for abstract thinking and long-term memory, proving that marijuana destroys the brain’s cerebrum and hippocampus, respectively.

THC from marijuana rips through the brain’s neurons, causing the cerebrum to ‘fold-in’ on itself.  With less neurons firing, teenagers were found to also have spotty, jerky movements and decreased motor skills.  This goes to show why so many American teenagers are nonathletic and unskilled, because their bodies simply cannot perform complex movements.  So they sit around and laze on their electronic devices, making typos as their uncoordinated fingers struggle to type iPads.

Researchers say the abnormalities of brains of teens who smoke marijuana daily, even after they stopped smoking, did not improve.  The brains of the teenagers and older adults tested closely resembled the brain patters of those with schizophrenia-type brain abnormality.

These abnormalities were recorded two years after the teens stopped using marijuana, possibly indicating long-term effects, and look similar to schizophrenia-related brain abnormalities.

The brains were shaped more abnormally for individuals who began marijuana use at a younger age, according to the reports, which suggest that memory regions of the brain are more susceptible to the drug at earlier ages.